Check your prejudices

ballot box

People don’t vote for policies

In the UK a couple of elections back, the website Vote For Polices showed that when asked to chose their preferred policies without knowing which party’s policies they were, voters preferred the Green Party. The Conservatives fared badly.

vote for policies choices

For whom did they vote in the real world? Yep; the Conservatives, who should have been fourth choice.

Now it’s your turn

Here are two websites where you can check your actual preferences for the imminent New Zealand election. I think “I Side With” is the most realistic:

Please check them out. You will be surprised. For me, I Side With produced a more credible result than Vote Compass; they allow users more sensible fine-tuning of the alternatives. Even so, I was surprised to find that New Zealand First came high on my list.

That led me to check New Zealand First’s policies, and another surprise – despite Winston Peters’ devious, opportunistic, and waka-jumping ways – his party’s policies are, mostly, surprisingly sensible.

Not enough to encourage me to vote for him though.

Sorry Winnie.

Here is my result from “I Side With”

Some of my old friends will be horrified, but my swing to the left has been on-going since waking up to the total failure of neo-liberal policies.

Here are my results from “Vote Compass”

Mana’s position was a surprise too, but despite Hone Harawera’s radical activist past, his policies too are generally sensible. I’d like to see him make his peace with the Maori Party and avoid splitting their vote.

 

 

 

 

A dearth of decency

Keep calm and avoid selfish peopleWhat is it with people?

A while back I gave one of my favourite places, Whanganui’s Red Eye Café, a miss because some inconsiderate idiot had parked precisely dead centre between two car parks taking up both and leaving no space for my little Freelander. I headed down the road for Oggie’s Café instead.

On the way I passed a man pushing a beat up van in the opposite direction. I stopped a hundred metres up the road and walked back to lend a hand. “May I help?” said I.

He looked at me dead-faced and said “No.”

Nothing more. No thank you; it’s OK; or kiss my backside. Just a flat expressionless “No.”

“You’re welcome.” I said, and trudged back up the road in a less enthusiatic frame of mind.

Perhaps for the first time in human history, the Good Old Days really did have something going for them. No wonder we have selfish and venal politicians and up-themselves media celebrities. The ubiquitous screen is corroding our ability to communicate and relate to people face-to-face; and it’s giving us Sarah Palin, Donald Trump, and the Kardashians.

The incidents I talked about above are becoming common. It’s going to get worse. From the cradle we’re encouraging our children to sink into the digital world, more and more they’re communicating electronically and learning how to behave from mainly toxic and obnoxious media.

There will be unhappy consequences.

ignorance